Denmark gives US $2.2m finance for Bangladesh’s apparel industry

BDApparelNews Desk
28 November 2018  

W worker putting finishing touches to shirts inside a readymade garments industry of Bangladesh.

W worker putting finishing touches to shirts inside a readymade garments industry of Bangladesh.

Denmark government has given US $2.2 million to continue assisting Bangladesh to focus on improving equality and working conditions in the country’s massive apparel industry.

The ongoing co-operation also contributes to ushering in more sustainable growth in an industry that accounts for over 82 per cent of Bangladesh’s export receipt.

“It obviously isn’t good enough when there are still problems at Bangladeshi garment factories,” said Danish Minister for Trade and Development Cooperation Mogens Jensen, according to a press release of the Danish government.

“I am therefore granting DKK 25 million, which will be used to improve the conditions for the textile workers in Bangladesh and other developing countries.”

“DKK 15 million of it will be allocated to the program, Better Work, which on a running basis conducts inspections and evaluates whether the factories follow the national regulations and international conventions on labour rights – and to environmental upgrades,” he said.

“The program is a good and constructive collaboration with international brands such as Nike, Levis and Gap to improve conditions at the garment factories,” he added.

ACCORD EXTENSION THE MAIN AGENDA?

“Denmark has to be at the forefront in regards to the global responsibility of corporations. But there is no quick fix in Bangladesh or other developing countries with a large textile production. We can help to improve the conditions in cooperation with international organisations and ethical trading alliances,” says Minister for Trade and Development Cooperation Mogens Jensen.

Shortly after the accident in Bangladesh almost a year ago, the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs initiated a partnership with the Danish garment and textile industry to improve the conditions at the factories in Bangladesh. One of the results of the partnership was the signing by seven large Danish textile companies of the European Accord, which works to ensure building- and fire safety in the factories.

But the Danish Minister for Trade and Development Cooperation Mogens Jensen wants a strong commitment by corporations and trade organisations.

“The partnership won’t succeed if the businesses don’t put a direct pressure on their trading partners in Bangladesh. The factory owners in Bangladesh need to understand that their international customers want this progress to happen. I believe they are also ready to pay for it."